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Toshiba’s LTO batteries are a really great option for a number of PHEV and stationary applications, but their relatively low energy density (84Wh/kg) makes them problematic for BEVs.

I see.
When is Subaru going to use LTO in PHEV?
We don't Subaru PHEV models here in Europe...

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Ok, but what about fast charging? I have heard it is slow....
Sometimes you need fast charging...

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LFP fast charging?

The Model 3 LFP has a peak 150 kW (EV database says 170 kW though - Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus LFP) charging and consistently would charge 90 kW without issue. I actually drove it 250+ miles this past weekend and DC charged 6 times while in Miami.

I just traded my Model 3 for a brand new Telluride and might be out of the market for a Solterra because the Telluride has exceeded my expectations. It's quieter than most EVs and just as smooth on the highways. I'm sticking with my Model Y or a Mach-E GTPE for a daily commuter.
 

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LFP fast charging?

The Model 3 LFP has a peak 150 kW (EV database says 170 kW though - Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus LFP) charging and consistently would charge 90 kW without issue. I actually drove it 250+ miles this past weekend and DC charged 6 times while in Miami.

I just traded my Model 3 for a brand new Telluride and might be out of the market for a Solterra because the Telluride has exceeded my expectations. It's quieter than most EVs and just as smooth on the highways. I'm sticking with my Model Y or a Mach-E GTPE for a daily commuter.
Ok, how much time to charge 20%-80% at 150KW?
I have heard many people having issues and charging slow because they couldn't reach 150KW.


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"DC charging may not work on AWD bz4x when the temperature is below 32 degrees Fahrenheit."

Best sign AWD uses LFP.
 

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"DC charging may not work on AWD bz4x when the temperature is below 32 degrees Fahrenheit."

Best sign AWD uses LFP.
If this is true, it sounds like there is no battery warming of any kind available which is troubling.
 

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"DC charging may not work on AWD bz4x when the temperature is below 32 degrees Fahrenheit."

Best sign AWD uses LFP.
I don't think so. All lith-ion don't like to be charged cold.
 

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"DC charging may not work on AWD bz4x when the temperature is below 32 degrees Fahrenheit."

Best sign AWD uses LFP.
Per the Solterra manual:

■Starting the EV system in an
extremely cold environment

When the traction battery is
extremely cold (below approxi-
mately -22°F [-30°C]) due to the
temperature outside of the vehicle, it
may not be possible to start the EV
system. In this case, try to start the
EV system again after the tempera-
ture of the traction battery increases
due to the outside temperature
increasing, etc.
 

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LFP is cheaper to make, can charge to 100% with no additional degradation, less likely to catch on fire, and no materials (Cobalt) that child slave labor in Africa are being used to mine. Downside is lower performance, less range, and heavier for the same capacity. Tesla is saving money making them, but I don't see much of that being passed on to the customer. U.S. spec Solterra has Lithium ion, not LFP.
Why do people say LFP is not Lithium-ion? A lithium iron phosphate (LFP) battery IS A TYPE of lithium-ion battery

Two of the more commonly used lithium-ion battery chemistries are Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) and Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP).
 

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Why do people say LFP is not Lithium-ion? A lithium iron phosphate (LFP) battery IS A TYPE of lithium-ion battery

Two of the more commonly used lithium-ion battery chemistries are Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) and Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP).
Good point. I should have said that LFPs are not the kind of Lithium-ion battery typically used in a modern BEV due to relatively low energy density compared to, for example, an NMC chemistry version (90-120Wh/kg vs 150-220Wh/kg).
 

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Good point. I should have said that LFPs are not the kind of Lithium-ion battery typically used in a modern BEV due to relatively low energy density compared to, for example, an NMC chemistry version (90-120Wh/kg vs 150-220Wh/kg).
Times are changing!

 

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Times are changing!

Here is a quote from the article you posted:

”Iron phosphate (LFP) batteries, which don’t use nickel or cobalt, are traditionally cheaper and safer, but they offer less energy density, which means less efficient and shorter range for electric vehicles.

However, they have improved enough recently that it now makes sense to use cobalt-free batteries in lower-end and shorter-range vehicles.

It also frees up the production of battery cells with other, more energy-dense chemistries to produce more longer-range vehicles.”

It appears Tesla has improved their LFP batteries to the point where they’re acceptable for their lower-end cars. This frees up their higher energy-density batteries for use in their longer-range models. The article also mentions that Tesla is researching other chemistries to try and get away from using nickel and cobalt, so LFP is likely going to be a stop-gap chemistry until higher energy-density alternatives are available.
 
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