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Toyota has revealed a new home battery storage system they're calling the "O-Uchi Kyuden System". The system would be used to deliver power in case of an emergency. It's based on the same battery tech as the bZ4X/Solterra/RZ.


TOKYO, June 2, 2022 - (JCN Newswire) - Toyota Motor Corporation (Toyota) has developed batteries based on the concept of "safe, long service life, high-quality, good value for price, and high performance" so that customers can use them with peace of mind. This technology utilizing many years of electrified vehicle development as well as on-board parts and units have been used to create the O-Uchi Kyuden System(1), a home storage battery system. Pre-orders for the system start today, and sales in Japan will begin in August through home builders and general construction companies.

Automotive parking light Wheel Car Hood Light


The O-Uchi Kyuden System uses electrified vehicle battery technology such as Toyota's battery control to provide a rated capacity of 8.7 kWh and a rated output of 5.5 kWh. This ensures safety and provides a supply of electricity to the entire home not just in normal situations, but even during power outages caused by natural disasters.

In addition, by linking with a photovoltaic system, it can supply the appropriate amount of electricity based on customer needs throughout the day and night. Toyota believes that using this system will encourage the use of solar power which is a renewable energy.

Unique to Toyota, the system supports supplying power(2) from electrified vehicles (HEV, PHEV, BEV, FCEV) at 100V AC, and can use electricity stored in electrified vehicles as a backup power source during power outages, allowing users to live with peace of mind.

In addition, future moves to IoT using a wireless LAN router connected to a hybrid power conditioner allow for storage capacity, operation mode, and other settings to be viewed and set in real-time from a dedicated app on a smartphone or tablet(3) (as of now, only available in Japanese).

(1) O-Uchi Kyuden System is a registered trademark of Toyota
(2) The maximum output from the vehicle supply adapter is 1.1 kWh
(3) Requires iOS 14.2 or later, Android 7.0 or later
 

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The O-Uchi Kyuden System uses electrified vehicle battery technology such as Toyota's battery control to provide a rated capacity of 8.7 kWh and a rated output of 5.5 kWh. This ensures safety and provides a supply of electricity to the entire home not just in normal situations, but even during power outages caused by natural disaster.

(2) The maximum output from the vehicle supply adapter is 1.1 kWh
Did they really mix up kW and kWh in an official press release or is this a bad translation?

Also funny that it says 'Unique to Toyota' when the Leaf, Ioniq 5 and F-150 lightning all already have V2L.
 

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Batteries, wether they are O-Uchi Kyuden System or Tesla Powerwall are a very very expensive way to back up a home in case you lose power compared to a liquid propane (LP) backup. Obviously if you live in a condo in Manhattan LP is going to be impossible. Likewise LP may not be practical for Tokyo, Osaka, or other dense municipalities. As many more Japanese homes are smaller homes in dense areas than US homes, I would expect that this system willl not be as popular in the US outside of NYC and San Francisco.
 

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The internal combustion engine has no market value for non moving applications. It is far too expensive a way to solve any engineering problem as motors and electrical power are normally available that can do the task for a fraction of the price.

On the other hand batteries have a lot of utility for applications where fossil fuels are not a viable option, or simply for people don't want to use fossil fuels.

Planned use in California to replace fossil fuels with solar and wind will require massive battery backup so that electricity is availalbe when the sun is not shining and the wind is not blowing. It makes no sense to develop a battery fleet of vehicles if they don't also work on the dual purpose of backing up electricity for the home.

A Chevy Bolt requires 4.2 MWh to run 15,000 miles according to the EPA. The US generated over 12 MWh per person in electricity in the year 2021. Now obviously we don't require one EV per capita and some EVs will be more and some less efficient than a Bolt, but for ease of calculation assume a baseline of one Chevy Bolt per capita. If you are starting with 12 MWh and intend to add 4.2 MWh over at least a 20 year period that is fairly reasonable growth rate roughly comparable to the growth in electricity production in the US in the 1990s. In the 1990s we increased generation by 2.267% per year which means roughly 13 years to add 33%. In earlier decades the rate of generation increase was far higher.

However, California only generates 4.6 MWh per capita per year from in state generation at present. The rest is imported, and in addition California is shutting down their last nuclear station, and right now has pledged to shut down all large hydroelectric plants by 2045. They have also essentially stopped construction of new natural gas plants and right now they have to be retired by 2045. In addition California has pledged to stop importing electricity from other states that is generated from fossil fuels or nuclear.

The easiest thing that California could do that would partially help is to put nuclear power on the renewable list for the law passed in 2018. They could still proceed with their plans to shut down Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant by 2025, but it would allow them to add a 4th generator to Palo Verde in AZ 100 miles across the CA border. It would also allow them to build small modular reactor (SMR) plants in Mexico and Nevada to generate electricity for export.
 

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The internal combustion engine has no market value for non moving applications. It is far too expensive a way to solve any engineering problem as motors and electrical power are normally available that can do the task for a fraction of the price.

On the other hand batteries have a lot of utility for applications where fossil fuels are not a viable option, or simply for people don't want to use fossil fuels.

Planned use in California to replace fossil fuels with solar and wind will require massive battery backup so that electricity is availalbe when the sun is not shining and the wind is not blowing. It makes no sense to develop a battery fleet of vehicles if they don't also work on the dual purpose of backing up electricity for the home.

A Chevy Bolt requires 4.2 MWh to run 15,000 miles according to the EPA. The US generated over 12 MWh per person in electricity in the year 2021. Now obviously we don't require one EV per capita and some EVs will be more and some less efficient than a Bolt, but for ease of calculation assume a baseline of one Chevy Bolt per capita. If you are starting with 12 MWh and intend to add 4.2 MWh over at least a 20 year period that is fairly reasonable growth rate roughly comparable to the growth in electricity production in the US in the 1990s. In the 1990s we increased generation by 2.267% per year which means roughly 13 years to add 33%. In earlier decades the rate of generation increase was far higher.

However, California only generates 4.6 MWh per capita per year from in state generation at present. The rest is imported, and in addition California is shutting down their last nuclear station, and right now has pledged to shut down all large hydroelectric plants by 2045. They have also essentially stopped construction of new natural gas plants and right now they have to be retired by 2045. In addition California has pledged to stop importing electricity from other states that is generated from fossil fuels or nuclear.

The easiest thing that California could do that would partially help is to put nuclear power on the renewable list for the law passed in 2018. They could still proceed with their plans to shut down Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant by 2025, but it would allow them to add a 4th generator to Palo Verde in AZ 100 miles across the CA border. It would also allow them to build small modular reactor (SMR) plants in Mexico and Nevada to generate electricity for export.
Nuclear power is only use is to boil the water to turn the turbines. If we hard some type of sun collector, it could do the same thing, boil water.
 

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The internal combustion engine has no market value for non moving applications. It is far too expensive a way to solve any engineering problem as motors and electrical power are normally available that can do the task for a fraction of the price.
Not to negate any of your other points, but when I was a kid back in the 70's one of the first applications of engine power I saw (that I was amazed by) was a Chevy V8 in a field on a farm running a water pump and powering a huge sprinkler system. We were driving out to the field to refuel it from a big tank in the pickup bed and start the irrigation engine.

Many applications, other than vehicles, are not about the cost but the availability (and portability) of fuel/power and (like you and others are stating) with battery technology with much more capacity than previously ever dreamed of there are certainly many novel applications emerging.

One additional Toyota announcement that hasn't really been publicized much is their "hydrogen battery" (my name not theirs). Having portable storage containers for hydrogen opens up a new avenue for servicing remote fixed location fuel cells and I would presume they will have a Mirai that can accept the new containers soon (they already demonstrated the concept) to show refueling is quick and easy just like exchanging propane tanks at the grocery store.
 

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Not to negate any of your other points, but when I was a kid back in the 70's one of the first applications of engine power I saw (that I was amazed by) was a Chevy V8 in a field on a farm running a water pump and powering a huge sprinkler system. We were driving out to the field to refuel it from a big tank in the pickup bed and start the irrigation engine.
In 1823, Samuel Brown patented the first internal combustion engine to be applied industrially in the U.S.; one of his engines pumped water on the Croydon Canal from 1830 to 1836. I didn't mean to imply that it was impossible to use an internal combustion engine for a stationary engineering application, I meant that there is no "market" for such devices. You would have to drive out and refill them with gasoline, and they would be very expensive to run. On the other hand there is a huge market for battery backup. Single family homes can usually be backed up with fossil fuel devices like LP at a much lower cost. But dense urban housing and commercial operations where LPN generators may be dangerous or require operation that needs people more skilled than clerks are natural places to use battery backup.
If I lived in a California exurb where wildfires result in frequent power outages, I would be concerned that my LPN system may increase the danger. I would want a battery system to keep my house wet and maintain a firewall.

The problem with ICE for vehicles was that they wanted to spin a crankshaft at a steady rate so a rear-engined, using a simple belt-drive functioning as a single-speed transmission was very inefficient. In particular it didn't provide much torque to start a car moving from standing position.

The 1891 Panhard et Levassor is considered a significant advance in automotive transmissions since it used a three-speed manual transmission.

A little known endeavor by Ferdnand Porsche in 1900 was to use a hybrid electric motor and a battery plus an internal combustion engine instead of a transmission. The electric motor would take car of getting a car moving from stationary position and then the ICE would take over. The concept was revived a century later in the Toyota Prius.
 

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And diesel-electric locomotives as well as submarines have been around just as long.
The integration of home and vehicle power is what radically changed in the mid 21st century from the 19th and 20th century.

A Solterra will use 394 kWh to drive 1250 miles (a standard EPA month). Compare that number to the typical power generation per month from in-state plants for major states in 2020. You can see that in particular in CA, NY, and NJ that the home power and the electric vehicle will have to be a closely integrated system, probably with a single meter for personal use on the integrated system. You will have to draw electricity at night when it is cheap, and charge your batteries (batteries in the vehicle or in the home) and use it for the home or vehicle when electricity is expensive or non-available. In the event of a prolonged blackout (because of wildfires for instance), you simply won't be able to drive far because you will have to conserve power to keep your home opertional. The price is for residential electricity for March 2022 and comes from Electric Power Monthly from the EIA.
kWh/capita​
2020 per month in-state generation​
cents per kWh​
1,007​
United States​
14.47​
407​
California​
26.71​
1,353​
Texas​
12.80​
970​
Florida​
13.50​
534​
New York​
19.74​
1,475​
Pennsylvania​
14.70​
1,128​
Illinois​
14.73​
855​
Ohio​
12.87​
930​
Georgia​
12.89​
993​
North Carolina​
12.24​
882​
Michigan​
17.43​
548​
New Jersey​
16.93​

CA, NY, and NJ heavily purchase electricity from nearby states. In fact the main reason that PA electric generation is so high is it is the state that exports the most electricity in the US.

There is a loose relationship between how much electricity is produced per capita in a state and the price. CA and NY seem to have expensive electricity because they don't produce much, but OH, GA, NC, and MI all produce about the same amount of electricity per capita, but residential electricity is much higher in MI. Palisades Power Plant , the latest nuclear plant to close is on the shores of Lake Michigan. Another factor is how much industry in the state uses electricity. Aluminum production requires a great deal of electricity, for instance.

I've only shown populous states in the table. Small states often have huge numbers (WY, WV, ND) because they export a lot of electricity. Sometimes they have very small numbers (VT, DE) because they import most of their electricity from other states. Electricity requirements vary considerably from state to state. Tennessee uses a lot of electricity because they tend to use electricity for air conditioning and heat. Maine uses very little electricity because it is way too cold for electric heat, and they don't need air conditioning. California controls demand with high prices compared to it's neighboring states.

So while it is probably not a big deal for the country as a whole to add 300-350 kWh per month of production capability if they are starting with 1007 kWh per month, given that the time period would be well over 20 years. That is a reasonable growth rate, consistent with what was accomplished in the 1990s.

California may not be able to support as many EVs per capita. Almost certainly Californians will need very tight integration between home electric use and vehicle electric use.
 

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If we could get some decent incentives for home solar then those projections would be augmented considerably by distributed power generation to both meet local needs and potentially prop up the grid overall in some areas.
 

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For the next 5 months I'll be paying 9.190 cents per kWh.
Yes, but that is just your generation price. I am paying 8.400 cents per kWh, but the total with distribution is 12.31 cents per kWh.
The table shows average rates for the entire state and new numbers are provided every month. The odds of it being identical to your own rate are very small. The takeaway from the table should be relative rates like California pays almost double the average national rate.

Electricity is a business. Price is not just a function of how hot or cold your state is. If it is expensive then you are more careful. California's solution to the rolling blackouts during the massive heat wave of 2020 is to introduce extra high rates during daytime hours in summer months. Clearly some elderly people on a fixed income are going to pay with their lives because of that policy.

If you are not happy with me using 394 kWh per month for a Solterra driving 15,000 miles per year for comparison, you can get a similar number using the amount of gasoline purchased in any given state.
  • 33,100,000 California gallons per day in 2020
  • 12,081,500,000 gallons per year (multiply by 365)
  • 33.7 kWh/gallon gasoline
  • 407,146,550,000 kWh of gasoline energy in california in 2020
  • 35% efficiency of engine
  • 142,501,292,500 kWh of effectively used by gasoline in Calfironia in whole year 2020
  • 39,576,757 population of California in 2020 census
  • 300.1 kWh per capita per month for 2020 in gasoline energy used directly by the drivetrain
That may be a better number (300 kWh) to use than assuming there will be one EV equvalent to a Solterra for every man woman and child in California (394 kWh). But it doesn't change the final conclusion.

The main point is that California simply does not generate much electricity per capita compared to other states and not much more than would be used by a fleet of EVs. And the state has adopted a law in 2018 that it must elimnate the source of 2/3 of that electricity by 2045 (no nuclear, no natural gas, and no hydrodynamic generation from large dams). In addition it cannot import electricity from these sources from other states. On top of that there are growing municipal laws that say natural gas must be replaced by electricity for home use in all new construction.

Trivia question, what region of the United States has by far the cleanest electricity generation (no other region comes close)? Hint: It is a portion of a one state containing ~2% of the nation's population and it is on the East Coast. The region also has very little electricity generated by Wind (like Oklahoma, Iowa, or Kansas) or Solar (like California).

Upstate New York State
25.0% natural gas
32.2% nuclear
34.9% hydrodynamic
5.1% wind
2.8% other

Nuclear and hydrodynamic are not on California's list of renewables, but they produce no carbon dioxide. California generates ~42% of electricity from natural gas.
 

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Just as some detractos blurt out, "we don't have the infrastructure to go to an all electric fleet", it has become just as popular for EV advocates to say "that is ridiculous. We just have to grow our production at a very reasonable rate".

From a nationwide view the latter statement is true. We need to grow energy production by about a third over a period of time of more than 20 years. Growth rates similar to that occurred in the 1990s. We don't even have to go back to the 50's, 60's, 70's or 80s.

But electricity production is a regional industry, not a national one. Hawaii is much worse than California. Most people assume that EVs would be a very good fit with Hawaii, as most of the population lives on one island which has a limited driving range so "range anxiety" is not a problem. Also the island is very eco-conscious so you would think they would be happy to switch to EVs.

In reality the Hawaiian electrical industry generates very little power per capita, the cost is astronomical, and it is one of the 7 worst states for carbon dioxide emission rate from electricity generation. The other 6 states are all heavily dependent on coal.
  1. WY - 83.9% electricity percentage from coal
  2. WV - 91.0%
  3. KY - 72.0%
  4. MO - 70.7%
  5. UT - 64.5%
  6. IN - 59.1%
  7. HI - 13.4%
The environmental improvement resulting from switching to EVs in these states is blunted by the amount of emissions from electrical generation.

kWh/capita​
2020 per month in-state generation​
cents per kWh in March 2022​
407​
California​
26.71​
519​
Hawaii​
39.97
534​
New York​
16.93​
548​
New Jersey​
19.74​

I'm not trying to be confrontational here, but are you trying to warn people not to move to California?
I'm not trying to warn people not to move to California or Hawaii, I just think that EV adoption is going to be much more difficult in certain regions. California is so far the most enthusiastic about adopting EVs, but while the nation as a whole has to increase electricity production by about a third, California has to increase generation by more than 75% to accomodate EVs.
 

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This article is precisely what I am talking about. If I could quote one section
The grid can handle EVs.
Simple division gives us the amount of energy actually needed to supply electricity if all cars were suddenly electric. The final number? It comes out to an increase of about 30% needed to supply all of that energy. ...
But then again, a 30% jump isn’t exactly tiny, either. But, this is where complex truths have to be considered again. Energy production in the United States was less than 1/4 of what it was in the year 2000. As we electrified more and more things in our houses and got air conditioning, the population was also growing. Energy produced, put into the grid, and used by people went up five times over 40 years. That’s a huge increase!
That quote is absolutely true if you are considering nationwide statistics. But some regional numbers particularly these four critical states, the 30% number is way too small. If you compare 300 kWh per capita per month to the national generation of 1007 kWh per capita per month, that is 30%. But that is not true in some other critical states that have all pledged to go 100% EV.

kWh/capita2020 per month in-state generationcents per kWh
1,007​
United States
14.47​
407​
California
26.71​
534​
New York
19.74​
548​
New Jersey
16.93​
 
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