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I would be so annoyed if I had to wait an hour behind one of these cars at a fast charging station!!!

I have a reservation in for the Silverado EV and waiting to see what the Chevy Equinox EV will offer. I'm hoping for 350KW fast charging.
I’m a day one cybertruck reservation. Hoping this car will be a bridge car for me (assuming Tesla finds a way to keep the cost down on the cybertruck, but that’s not looking good these days).
 

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Charging speed looks bleak. But, it could be that it's a preproduction prototype with buggy software that needs an OTA update. Battery could also be cold. Wish there was decent route planning that integrated chargers into the route and on-route battery preconditioning. Also, there's no guarantee that the Subaru will be just as bad at charging. Or this bZ4X could just be a bad sample with respect to the DC charging speed. Fingers crossed, I'm forging ahead with the Solterra.
Yes hoping for an input by Toyota saying that this is preproduction car/software more limited than production cars… as for the battery being cold yes, but T-shirt temp cold is not that cold… we have -25º C commonly over here in Quebec 🥶 fast charging will be 10-15kw ? 😖
 

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Yes hoping for an input by Toyota saying that this is preproduction car/software more limited than production cars… as for the battery being cold yes, but T-shirt temp cold is not that cold… we have -25º C commonly over here in Quebec 🥶 fast charging will be 10-15kw ? 😖
Welcome to the forum @Villeneuve80! What's the charging infrastructure like where you are? Are there a lot of DC fast chargers?
 

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Hopefully there's a much faster part of the charging curve between 10% and 60% state of charge that takes only 20 minutes and gets you 1 1/2 to 2 hours down the Interstate.
This is definitely not a car you should be taking on the interstate. It's for city driving and on the off chance you run low on juice, you can DC fast charge just enough to get you home for overnight level 2 changing.
 

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This is definitely not a car you should be taking on the interstate. It's for city driving and on the off chance you run low on juice, you can DC fast charge just enough to get you home for overnight level 2 changing.
It really depends on how far you want to drive on the interstate. I'd think twice about taking multi-day-driving long trips (like I'm doing right now in our Outback, 600 miles yesterday, 400 miles today), but I wouldn't hesitate driving say 300 miles at a shot if I had somewhere to L3/L2 charge at/near my destination.
 

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This is definitely not a car you should be taking on the interstate. It's for city driving and on the off chance you run low on juice, you can DC fast charge just enough to get you home for overnight level 2 changing.
I will definitely be taking it on long road trips on the Interstate, utilizing strategies by expert EV road trippers. The range is more than adequate. The only issue is the charging speed, which we don't yet know real world for the dialed-in one that will ship in July.
 

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And it is for that reason that I'll be taking a late delivery of the Solterra. By the time it arrives, many of you will have provided me with real world experience.
Range is not an issue, since ideally you'd try to stop every 90 minutes to charge 20 minutes in the sweet spot of the charging curve. This gets you to the destination faster albeit with more, but faster, stops.
 

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Range is not an issue, since ideally you'd try to stop every 90 minutes to charge 20 minutes in the sweet spot of the charging curve. This gets you to the destination faster albeit with more, but faster, stops.
I have a friend who just drove his Tesla Model 3 on vacation from Ohio to Florida, and he was able to skip a number of SuperCharger stops, but when I tried to plot a similar course excluding SuperCharging stations (as a Solterra is not currently able to use those), trying to find enough DCFC stations for the trip was just about impossible. Do you live in a part of the USA where there are lots of DCFC stations?
 

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I have a friend who just drove his Tesla Model 3 on vacation from Ohio to Florida, and he was able to skip a number of SuperCharger stops, but when I tried to plot a similar course excluding SuperCharging stations (as a Solterra is not currently able to use those), trying to find enough DCFC stations for the trip was just about impossible. Do you live in a part of the USA where there are lots of DCFC stations?
Yeah, it looks tough if you're starting in Columbus, since WV is your problem. You'd have to charge to 100% at the WV line, limit speed to 60 mph, and still make it to VA with 10% left. From then on, it's clear sailing. I'm using A Better Route Planner and Hyundai Kona as close enough to the Solterra for charging and range. PlugShare is a great app to find all the charging stations, too.
 

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I recently saw a YouTube video that said no EV could drive from Denver to Dallas due to the large gap in charging stations along the way. Even the long range Tesla. They did mention Tesla was installing a station to bridge that gap sometime in the future.

Not sure if it was, or is, true or not.
 

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I recently saw a YouTube video that said no EV could drive from Denver to Dallas due to the large gap in charging stations along the way. Even the long range Tesla. They did mention Tesla was installing a station to bridge that gap sometime in the future.

Not sure if it was, or is, true or not.
It can be done easily, even in a Hyundai Kona. But, it'd take 17 hours including 4 total hours of charging. One of those charging hours is at a 50 kW station in Kansas. A Better Route Planner app shows this real quick.
 

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It can be done easily, even in a Hyundai Kona. But, it'd take 17 hours including 4 total hours of charging. One of those charging hours is at a 50 kW station in Kansas. A Better Route Planner app shows this real quick.
I guess they were referring to the direct route South, not some convoluted route required to hit the necessary charging stations. That said, Google Maps says it would take 12.5 hours going the direct route in an ICE, so it's not that much difference besides charging time.
 

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I recently saw a YouTube video that said no EV could drive from Denver to Dallas due to the large gap in charging stations along the way. Even the long range Tesla. They did mention Tesla was installing a station to bridge that gap sometime in the future.

Not sure if it was, or is, true or not.
Some of the issues you may face if there's "one option" could be a site that is entirely down, causing issues for you. This happened last year on a holiday weekend with the Electrify America network on the east coast - it wouldn't allow anyone to charge! You probably need to budget an extra couple percent to make sure you can make it to an alternate DCFC in the event of a total site failure, I second the idea of using ABRP for that!
 

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If at least it was charging at 100kwh.
Listen to Kyle’s comment starting at 56:40. Very disappointing, to a point where I’m reconsidering.
I pressed forward with my order despite knowing about Kyle's observation. I have to believe this is a software tuning error, and not by design. It's hard to believe it would make it all the way to delivery with this problem. It'd be a huge embarrassment. I'd like to see the test on a Solterra.
 
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