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I live in a remote area with very little EV infrastructure, so using EVgo is not an option. There are a few level 2 chargers at local hotels I can try to use, but probably will install a level 2 at the house. I can't tell if Subaru recommends a particular brand and/or model? The installer QMerit doesn't offer service in my area, so the discount Subaru promised at the time of reservation won't work for me.

Can anyone help me understand what brand charger to trust? I feel like Subaru just sort of leaves you hanging to figure it out yourself, and as a first time EV car owner I am clueless.

Thanks in advance.
 

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There are lots of EV chargers available, from the basic (unintelligent, no Internet access or control) models to ones that offer Internet/smartphone app access and give quite a bit of detail.

So, your first decision is the amount of remote interaction you want with your EVSE (charger).

Personally, I just installed a GRIZZL-E Smart charger, but it’s not really all that smart. It doesn’t have its own app but uses the ChargeLab app, and it provides limited information. However, it does allow for time scheduling of charging, and in my case, that was all I needed. And, the price was right.

Look around a bit on Amazon and get a feel for what’s available, and read the reviews. Some charger models appear to be significantly more problematic than other models, so be aware of that aspect. Prices range all across the board…

In the end, there is not a “best” or “right” charger…it all depends on your needs and desires.

I hope that helps…
 

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I recently purchased and installed a ChargePoint Home Flex (40 amp/240 v, plug in). I already had the outlet, and for the last 5.75 years I've been using the TurboCord 16 amp/240 v, plug in. I bought the CPHF because I wanted faster charges than I can get with the 16 amp unit.

I'm very satisfied with the CPHF, as I was with the TurboCord. The CPHF is smart/connected and uses the ChargePoint app (also for public L2 charging). It is a bit pricey, but there's a 30% federal tax credit for the purchase/installation. It is very user friendly (easy to handle, long flexible cable). Its app estimates your cost to charge using the utility company chosen in the setup process.

As @FelineFreddie mentioned, there's no single "right charger", but this one is worth considering. That said, there are more affordable units out there, but this one has a good reputation.
 

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I like that the CP app gives me info like this.

I don't know that the Solterra does (don't have mine yet).

My only gripe with that particular app info is that the time reported (e.g. 5 h 48 m) is how long the car was plugged in, not how long the charging took. I need to report that issue to the app developers.

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I live in a remote area with very little EV infrastructure, so using EVgo is not an option. There are a few level 2 chargers at local hotels I can try to use, but probably will install a level 2 at the house. I can't tell if Subaru recommends a particular brand and/or model? The installer QMerit doesn't offer service in my area, so the discount Subaru promised at the time of reservation won't work for me.

Can anyone help me understand what brand charger to trust? I feel like Subaru just sort of leaves you hanging to figure it out yourself, and as a first time EV car owner I am clueless.

Thanks in advance.
there is a guy on YouTube who did some good reviews. Your profile doesn’t say where you live, but some of the cables are useless in cold weather as they wont unroll. If you’re in a colder climate, it is worth researching.

found it. https://www.youtube.com/@StateOfChargeWithTomMoloughney/videos
 

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2023 Subaru Solterra with Technology Package, Platinum White with Two-Tone Black Roof
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I have been looking at the ChargePoint Home Flex or the Grizzl E. Curious if the smart features on the charge point are enough of a value add on top of the "smart" features of the Solterra.
Both great choices! I was debating between these two also and ultimately went with the ChargePoint. I like the smart features and from what I had read, the cable and handle on the ChargePoint is probably best in the industry in colder weather. Also the built in holster and light. I have only been able to test it so far on a demo Solterra so that’s my only experience actually using it. But it seems great and easy to install

but the grizzl-e is a solid unit in all reviews also.
 

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It depends what you need, but I have stuffed about 230 Km back into mine with the 120v level 1 charger they give you. I have never used a level 2 charger, although there are free ones in town.

Not a problem at all so far. I will charge tonight, as tomorrow I go to see my daughter, but that's only a 150 Km rounder.
 

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It depends what you need, but I have stuffed about 230 Km back into mine with the 120v level 1 charger they give you. I have never used a level 2 charger, although there are free ones in town.

Not a problem at all so far. I will charge tonight, as tomorrow I go to see my daughter, but that's only a 150 Km rounder.
My 16 amp/240v TurboCord was adequate for my purposes for over 5 years (about 3x as fast as the 120v that came with my car), but on numerous occasions my wife would wake up in the morning and ask if there was enough charge in our EV to take a trip to [X] that day. Invariably the answer was "no, why didn't you say something last night?", and the 16 amp unit wasn't fast enough to solve the problem. The 40 amp ChargePoint (my current car takes only 30 amps, the Solterra only 27.5) is enough of a step up to make many of those impulse trips possible. Sure, I could try to persuade my wife to plan ahead better, but life doesn't always work that way. I could get by with the 16 amp/240v, but almost certainly not with the 12 amp/120v included EVSE.

@EV Newbie, you would be the best judge of your own needs.
 

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I looked at my needs and one reason I have a Solterra, or an EV at all, is that I should be able to fill all my normal needs easily on my 120v socket. I'm by myself and my chores amount to 40 Km on a normal day and if I'm not using the car it can be plugged in. I have avoided charging on a couple of nights now as it was easily close enough, for anything that might come up. A 300 Km trip to the mainland is as bad as it can get. ;)
 

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Mine takes 31.8 or 31.9 as it is charging. The display flicks back and forth sometimes.
Maybe the AC charger is actually bigger than spec?

I've had this EVSE now for almost 5 years, never failed me.
My son with his Tesla bought the same one when his OEM quit working a couple years ago.
This brand is sold under a few other names.
I also have a multitude adapters for it, so I can charge anywhere with any type of plug.
 

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My peak current reported by the EVSE (an Autel Maxicharger 10kW unit) was 31.7A. I was starting at about an 82% SOC and let it charge to 100%.


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My EVSE is configured to use my Home Assistant server as the OCPP Server, so it logs all of the charge data. I use the HACS OCPP add-on.

The ambient temperature was about 54F or 12C during the charge. The vehicle had not been driven in a few hours.

Multiply the current in A by the line voltage at the EVSE, which is about 239V after the voltage drop for the #6 circuit that supplies it, with about 242-244V at the meter during the daytime when the solar PV system is running. This was late in the day, so it’s probably a couple of V shy of that.

I’ll put a voltmeter on it when I get a chance.

Otherwise 31.7 * 239 is 7.58kW being consumed at the EVSE. There’s a 25 foot cable to the car, so there are some losses there, too.
 

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I live in a remote area with very little EV infrastructure, so using EVgo is not an option. There are a few level 2 chargers at local hotels I can try to use, but probably will install a level 2 at the house. I can't tell if Subaru recommends a particular brand and/or model? The installer QMerit doesn't offer service in my area, so the discount Subaru promised at the time of reservation won't work for me.

Can anyone help me understand what brand charger to trust? I feel like Subaru just sort of leaves you hanging to figure it out yourself, and as a first time EV car owner I am clueless.

Thanks in advance.

Check out ENEL
 

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I live in a remote area with very little EV infrastructure, so using EVgo is not an option. There are a few level 2 chargers at local hotels I can try to use, but probably will install a level 2 at the house. I can't tell if Subaru recommends a particular brand and/or model? The installer QMerit doesn't offer service in my area, so the discount Subaru promised at the time of reservation won't work for me.

Can anyone help me understand what brand charger to trust? I feel like Subaru just sort of leaves you hanging to figure it out yourself, and as a first time EV car owner I am clueless.

Thanks in advance.
I selected the Grizzl-e smart charger. It was $475 on Amazon.
Amazon description: Grizzl-E New Level 2 Smart EV Charger, 16/24/32/40 Amp, NEMA 06-50/14-50Plug, 24 feet Premium, Indoor/Outdoor Car Charging Station (White, NEMA 14-50)
This was a good quality option, made in Canada, is semi-portable so if you ever move its easy to take along. Also, there is a Federal tax credit for ev chargers in 2023 in the amount of $300, and my local power company offers a $250 rebate. My local electrician installed the NEMA plug for me (its an electric range plug) on a 50 amp breaker for $400. They wanted $450 and i told him i had an offer from QMerit and Subaru where my cost was $400 so they decided to match that.
That gave me a total cost of approximately $900 (with tax) on the charger and install, then the $400 EVgo card (you can use it when traveling Interstates - plus they are installing more daily) plus the $300 Federal tax credit and the $250 electric company rebate puts $950 back in my pocket, making the charger essentially free. You can go a long way on a charge, and turning off the A/C increases mileage by about 20-25%. Best of luck!
 

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I selected the Grizzl-e smart charger. It was $475 on Amazon.
Amazon description: Grizzl-E New Level 2 Smart EV Charger, 16/24/32/40 Amp, NEMA 06-50/14-50Plug, 24 feet Premium, Indoor/Outdoor Car Charging Station (White, NEMA 14-50)
This was a good quality option, made in Canada, is semi-portable so if you ever move its easy to take along. Also, there is a Federal tax credit for ev chargers in 2023 in the amount of $300, and my local power company offers a $250 rebate. My local electrician installed the NEMA plug for me (its an electric range plug) on a 50 amp breaker for $400. They wanted $450 and i told him i had an offer from QMerit and Subaru where my cost was $400 so they decided to match that.
That gave me a total cost of approximately $900 (with tax) on the charger and install, then the $400 EVgo card (you can use it when traveling Interstates - plus they are installing more daily) plus the $300 Federal tax credit and the $250 electric company rebate puts $950 back in my pocket, making the charger essentially free. You can go a long way on a charge, and turning off the A/C increases mileage by about 20-25%. Best of luck!
Good choice.

The tax credit is 30%, up to a maximum of $300 (includes installation cost).
 
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