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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everybody, first post. Very excitied about the Solterra. We are outdoors enthusiasts and one glaring ommission seems to be the lack of a 120v outlet. It would be nice to access that big battery during a camping trip. I would also like to see a solar charging option for camping as well.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (me) 2020 Forester Limited (Spouse)
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Fortunately, that first one is easily rectified with a simple inverter. That also means it can be sized for the need. Built in inverters typically have very low power output which makes them unusable for many things folks might want ot do while camping/glamping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
nobody wants a "simple" inverter (5amp or less) anymore. Campers need an inverter that will run a coffee pot or a microwave. While this could be added, it would certainly void the battery warranty. RAV4 Prime is a good example. Comes with a 1500 watt inverter. F150 lightning is gonna come with a heavy duty outlet that will run a small construction site. Seems like a missed opportunity.
 

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Obviously, we've seen the 100V 50Hz/60Hz 1500W Japanese Solterra inverter outlet picture on a different thread, and the 220/50/1500 for the European model...

I looked at the connector and wiring harnesses in the EWD for the US-spec Solterra and don't see any pre-wired connector for the inverter. I have no access to the Electrical Wiring Diagram for Japan or EU to use in comparison.

I was hoping that the US-spec RAV4 Prime 120V/60Hz/1500W inverter might just plug right in, if they had pre-wired it. Then we could all just order one of those and go on with life. This really needs to be at least a Port Installed Option.

I believe that since it runs off of the HV wiring, it might be a bit more complicated and much better insulated than a simple 12VDC supply to the inverter would have been.

That they include a 1500W inverter on some trims of the US-spec RAV4 Prime, makes this look like an omission to save money, like Toyota US seems to have chosen with Advanced Park (the number one reason I am ordering a Solterra instead of the bZ4X).

Keep harping on Subaru and Toyota about what we really want to have on our cars.
 

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I'm right there with you on the disappointment that Subaru didn't include a 1500W inverter -- at least as an option. I would have even gotten the Touring trim if that was the only trim that included the inverter. That and no towing capacity are two places where I think Subaru really dropped the ball on appealing to current Subaru owners.
 

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I'm right there with you on the disappointment that Subaru didn't include a 1500W inverter -- at least as an option. I would have even gotten the Touring trim if that was the only trim that included the inverter. That and no towing capacity are two places where I think Subaru really dropped the ball on appealing to current Subaru owners.
Are you disappointed enough not to buy a Solterra?
 

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We are mostly talking about an inverter powered from the HV Traction Battery (72.8kWH), not the little 12V/49A "car" battery. That's what could easily keep my refrigerator running for many days during a long power outage. Or camping... yeah, little pop-up trailer but plenty of power. Just make sure you can make it from the campground back to the charging station.
 

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...I can get the 2025 Solterra with 1500W inverter, 1500 lb towing capacity, and a sweet glove box! Maybe even a small frunk for the charging cable!
With any luck, and as heavy as the vehicle is, it should handle 5,000 pounds easily. Two thumbs up for the rest as well (I'm also fumed there's no power passenger seat, especially seeing pictures of them in other markets).
 

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With any luck, and as heavy as the vehicle is, it should handle 5,000 pounds easily. Two thumbs up for the rest as well (I'm also fumed there's no power passenger seat, especially seeing pictures of them in other markets).
They might be concerned more about the continuous power draw with such a heavy load. With a new vehicle like this, a lot of new design components in the electrical chain. Just takes one link to overheat or fail to stop the car, or worse, a fire. They might want some experience with the car for a while. Better to have a component like that fail without a significant load on it.
 

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But they have been making either that exact inverter, or similar for quite a while, it showed up in the first run of RAV4 Primes, and they are fitting it in Japanese and some EU Solterras.

I get that they are probably trying to meet a price point, and especially for those states which limit EV rebates by MSRP.

Still, at least make it a dealer-installable option.
 

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But they have been making either that exact inverter, or similar for quite a while, it showed up in the first run of RAV4 Primes, and they are fitting it in Japanese and some EU Solterras.

I get that they are probably trying to meet a price point, and especially for those states which limit EV rebates by MSRP.

Still, at least make it a dealer-installable option.
Does the inverter run off the traction battery or the 12V?
 

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Traction battery, at least according to the RAV4 Prime documentation, and I suspect the Solterra/bZ4X is similar. Absolutely no reason to charge the 12 aux battery from the traction battery in order to keep it topped off while the 12V supplies current to the AC inverter.

In the RAV4 Prime, the engine will even start to keep the 18.1kWH traction battery charged if it drops below a certain level.

When EU Solterra owner's manuals are available, we can get a better answer to that question, unless someone has access to the electrical diagrams for EU market Solterra or bZ4X to get a definitive answer.

For the RAV4 Prime, there's even a dongle which plugs into the J1772 inlet and provides a 100V 1500W outside outlet:

Synthetic rubber Composite material Bicycle part Font Cylinder


I couldn't find the better picture which showed the AC outlet side.
 

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Here's someone's pic with a cord plugged in. This was also sold for the Japanese market Prius PHV.

Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Tire Automotive tail & brake light


And a full explanation from Toyota, albeit in Japanese:


Translated by Google:

How to use Prius PHV Vehicle Power Connector

* Please check the following 4 points before supplying power.
・ The parking brake is applied.
・ The headlamp is off.
・ The power switch is off and the engine is running. It is in a state where it does not cover.
・ The bonnet is closed.

1 Press the power switch twice without stepping on the brake to turn on the ignition. (Ignition ON (right) is displayed on the display
Please make sure it is done)

The advice screen for starting operation (lower right figure) is displayed.
If this happens, press the meter operation switch (see page 2) attached to the handle to return to the previous screen. If you do not operate the meter operation switch for a certain period of time, the advice screen for starting operation will be displayed again.

2 Use the meter operation switch (shown on the right) attached to the handle to switch the display.
Press (right figure) to switch the display contents (setting screen).
By pressing (right figure), change the item for which you want to change the setting, select (Vehicle customization), and press the OK button (right figure).

3 Use to select and press External Power Supply in the Vehicle Customization menu (figure on the right).
Meter operation switch
Enter button
Then press to select the power supply mode and press. The figure on the right is the EV power supply mode screen. The difference between EV power supply mode and HV power supply mode will be explained on the next page.

4 When the confirmation screen appears on the display, press “OK”. (Lower left figure). Then use to select the vehicle power connector and press. (Lower right figure).

* Power supply mode
■ EV power supply mode External power supply is performed using only the power stored in the drive battery. Power supply will be terminated when the remaining amount of drive battery that can supply power is exceeded.
■ HV power supply mode If the remaining amount of the drive battery that can be supplied with power is reduced while the external power is being supplied, the engine will start.
It operates and continues power supply. When the fuel level warning light comes on, power supply ends.
Since the engine operates, it is necessary to park in a well-ventilated place.

5 Plug the electrical outlet into the outlet of the vehicle power connector.

6 Insert the vehicle power connector into the normal charging inlet (below) of the PHV charging port.

7 If you press the power switch on the upper side of the vehicle power connector twice in a row, the charge indicator will change from blinking to lit after a while. After turning on, turn on the power of the electric appliances.

Can supply power up to a maximum power consumption of 1,500 W or less

Subaru of America, are you listening, this is what we want on the Solterra, although obviously with a 5-15R connector.
 

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While perhaps not ideal, is that worse than not having the feature?
I personally don't care. I have a couple of spare inverters at home that I can use connecting directly to the 12V battery. I have used them before with my Kona during power outages. It is only 600 watts but plenty enough for essential short term needs.

On the Kona EV forum (InsideEVs) guys there have done a lot of testing with battery inverters. They found the car charging the 12V battery can sustain a 1500W charge/draw, so that is plenty of power, incl for a campsite. Not sure what the Solterra will be, but hopefully it will be similar.

At our off-grid cabin, our solar inverter is 1500W and is plenty for our uses there. Enough to power a toaster, blender, small power tools, etc (not all at once of course). Lights are all LED and TV, etc take very little power. Only time I need the generator is to run the log splitter which is only once or twice a year. So you really don't need as much power as you may think.
 
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