Subaru Solterra Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you have or plan to have a portable Level 2 charger? Which one?
I'm still shopping for an indoor/outdoor compatible model and I'm curious what people would recommend (or what I should stay away from)...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One thing I was wondering is whether any of these portable chargers let us set an upper limit for the Solterra's battery capacity. For example, I want the charger to stop when the car's battery is no higher than 75-80% (or whatever that would translate to in miles). Can portable chargers do that? Can any charger?
 

·
Registered
2021 Ascent Limited; 2023 Bolt EUV Premier w/S&S, SC
Joined
·
231 Posts
One thing I was wondering is whether any of these portable chargers let us set an upper limit for the Solterra's battery capacity. For example, I want the charger to stop when the car's battery is no higher than 75-80% (or whatever that would translate to in miles). Can portable chargers do that? Can any charger?
Here's a snip from page 107 in the Owner's Manual. There's also a note that says "The selected upper limit value is common to AC charging and DC charging."



Font Number Circle Document Event
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Do you have or plan to have a portable Level 2 charger? Which one?
I'm still shopping for an indoor/outdoor compatible model and I'm curious what people would recommend (or what I should stay away from)...
When you say portable level 2 charger, you are talking about an EVSE cable that plugs into a 30-50 amp receptacle like you may find in some garages in the US? The charger is actually built into the car and the cables are EVSE’s. I am not trying to be the grammar police I just wanted to make sure I understood because it never occurred to me to buy a level 2 EVSE. I always figured I would level 2 charge at home using a Pulsar Plus Wallbox and Level 3 on road trips at EVGO or others. And I would keep the Level 1 EVSE cable in the car for any desperate 120 volt last resort charging.
What scenario do you see needing a Level 2 EVSE cable? Visiting family that have a 240 volt outlet in their garage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
What scenario do you see needing a Level 2 EVSE cable? Visiting family that have a 240 volt outlet in their garage?
I’m a different poster. I would probably take my EVSE off the wall and bring it on trips if my destination was the in-laws who have a nice 240V outlet that we used when we brought our motorhome. Other relatives have 240 outlets in their garages and workshops. Kids have EVSE for their Teslas, but I don’t know which car-end connector(s) they have. Plenty of reasons, but not just generally finding a 240 outlet. I guess there are always RV parks. Plenty of 240 outlets (RV 30 and 14-50).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When you say portable level 2 charger, you are talking about an EVSE cable that plugs into a 30-50 amp receptacle like you may find in some garages in the US? The charger is actually built into the car and the cables are EVSE’s. I am not trying to be the grammar police I just wanted to make sure I understood because it never occurred to me to buy a level 2 EVSE. I always figured I would level 2 charge at home using a Pulsar Plus Wallbox and Level 3 on road trips at EVGO or others. And I would keep the Level 1 EVSE cable in the car for any desperate 120 volt last resort charging.
What scenario do you see needing a Level 2 EVSE cable? Visiting family that have a 240 volt outlet in their garage?
.
My planned usage is similar to n6nl's, so near as I can tell I'm trying to find a "Portable EVSE" that supports the ability to plug into common USA 240V outlets (I don't know the specific types yet)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
My planned usage is similar to n6nl's, so near as I can tell I'm trying to find a "Portable EVSE" that supports the ability to plug into common USA 240V outlets (I don't know the specific types yet)
I can’t find a more recent comparison review than this one, but Tom has a good reputation as far as I’m aware. EV Charger Review: The AmazingE and AmazingE Fast

These portable charging cables aren’t cheap, and they’re basically just an EVSE with a more “portable” form-factor: you’re basically buying a slim-line version of an EVSE. And I’m not aware of any that have “universal” NEMA connectivity, i.e. - the ability to switch between various plug adapters. If it were me, I would go for the 14-50 plug as that’s becoming the most common from what I’ve read (vs a welder plug like a 6-50).
 

·
Registered
Vancouver, 2018 Crosstrek Limited
Joined
·
333 Posts
I have a portable EVSE with a 14-50 plug end for my 240v garage outlet. I also have adapters to use it with 6-50 welder receptacles and with various RV campground outlets. Greatly extends where you can charge in the boonies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I have a portable EVSE with a 14-50 plug end for my 240v garage outlet. I also have adapters to use it with 6-50 welder receptacles and with various RV campground outlets. Greatly extends where you can charge in the boonies.
I’ve only seen this on my friend’s Tesla charging cable.

It would be handy to know what brand and model you have,
 

·
Registered
Vancouver, 2018 Crosstrek Limited
Joined
·
333 Posts
I’ve only seen this on my friend’s Tesla charging cable.
It would be handy to know what brand and model you have,
I have this one, can sometimes be found cheaper on sale and with coupons.
My son bought it as well, when his Tesla OEM one crapped out (overheating and throttling back the charge). Works great.

This is the same one, just a diff brand name.


And this welder adapter, can be found cheaper, too, sometimes.
And built my own RV adapter. Browse down a few posts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I have this one, can sometimes be found cheaper on sale and with coupons.
My son bought it as well, when his Tesla OEM one crapped out (overheating and throttling back the charge). Works great.

This is the same one, just a diff brand name.


And this welder adapter, can be found cheaper, too, sometimes.
And built my own RV adapter. Browse down a few posts.
Now I understand. From an electrical safety perspective (particularly if it’s raining), I wouldn’t personally use that sort of adapter arrangement. I thought you had something like the Tesla charging cable that has a removable short cord at the wall end that allows various NEMA cables to be connected.

What you’re using isn’t something I would be willing to use at that power level in an outdoor environment, but if it works for you, more power to you (no pun intended :)).
 

·
Registered
Vancouver, 2018 Crosstrek Limited
Joined
·
333 Posts
Now I understand. From an electrical safety perspective (particularly if it’s raining), I wouldn’t personally use that sort of adapter arrangement. I thought you had something like the Tesla charging cable that has a removable short cord at the wall end that allows various NEMA cables to be connected.

What you’re using isn’t something I would be willing to use at that power level in an outdoor environment, but if it works for you, more power to you (no pun intended :)).
The adapters go on the plug end which are normally indoors. And the Tesla adapter is at the car end, which is actually more exposed. And they are all grounded, too. RVers use adapter plugs all the time... But up to you, of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
The adapters go on the plug end which are normally indoors. And the Tesla adapter is at the car end, which is actually more exposed. And they are all grounded, too. RVers use adapter plugs all the time... But up to you, of course.
If you’re referring to an outlet that has an RV box, there’s usually a closable cover so there will be no “exposed” connections.

If someone uses an adaptor that isn’t designed to be weatherproof, then there will be an exposed connection. In nice weather there should be no issues. I’m just the kind of person that would want a portable EVSE that could safely be used in all weather conditions (without relying on the ground to save my bacon). The problem is I haven’t found one that has that Tesla-charger-like setup, so at this point it would be a tradeoff.

But to each his own.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Carry a roll of Scotch 3M Super 33+ electrical tape. Wrap where the two connectors mate with a layer of tape. That stuff is flexible and easily removable. Use that specific brand and type of tape: 3M Super 33+.

We've been RVers for decades.
 

·
Registered
Vancouver, 2018 Crosstrek Limited
Joined
·
333 Posts
If you’re referring to an outlet that has an RV box, there’s usually a closable cover so there will be no “exposed” connections.

If someone uses an adaptor that isn’t designed to be weatherproof, then there will be an exposed connection. In nice weather there should be no issues. I’m just the kind of person that would want a portable EVSE that could safely be used in all weather conditions (without relying on the ground to save my bacon). The problem is I haven’t found one that has that Tesla-charger-like setup, so at this point it would be a tradeoff.

But to each his own.
The one in your pic, 14-50, doesn't require an adapter. The EVSE comes with a 14-50 plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Carry a roll of Scotch 3M Super 33+ electrical tape. Wrap where the two connectors mate with a layer of tape. That stuff is flexible and easily removable. Use that specific brand and type of tape: 3M Super 33+.

We've been RVers for decades.
I think I just heard the head of my friend who is a licensed electrician explode, lol

i imagine this works well most of the time, but it’s just not something I would do.

Again, I’m not going to try and convince anyone else that they need to do things my way. :) It’s just what I’m comfortable with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
If it’s temporary, the tape will keep most moisture out of where the connectors mate.

For longer term, I use a wrap of tape (to make it easy to remove later), 1/3 overlap mastic, compress it in your hand to seal it, and three 1/3 overlap wraps of tape, followed by an application of a spray coating (spray paint works fine). The wraps must completely cover the connector and a short portion of the outdoor-rated cable. I’ve been doing this for antennas mounted on towers at mountaintop radio sites for RF connections and for general electrical for decades.

One wrap of tape will at least keep rain out of the connection for the short term and is preferable to nothing if rain is expected.

I don’t know why your friend’s head would explode, but if he has a better solution, I’m one to hear it and improve on how I do things.

This is for mating connectors which can’t be shielded by an appropriate permanently mounted NEMA-rated enclosure.

It’s only for temporary weatherproofing of two cord-mounted connectors.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top