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Hey all,
New to this forum but a life-long Subaru owner... First car was a 1983 GL Wagon! Owned Outbacks for many years, now holding onto my 2014 Crosstrek Hybrid. That said, I have two reservations placed for ID4's (one 2022, one 2023), but likely will be dropping both of them if the federal EV tax credit isn't upheld for existing reservation holders who haven't signed a contract.
I had high hopes for the Solterra, but the battery is so sub-par compared to every other vehicle in this price range that I can't get myself to reserve one. The sweet spot seems to be
Subaru's newer (2019?) plug-in Hybrid, but was again let down when I learned that Colorado residents are out of luck. BIG MISTAKE by Subaru.
What I dont understand is why Subaru doesnt just re-engineer their existing, fantastic, best selling vehicles as BEV's. An electric Outback Wilderness would outsell every other vehicle in the entire state, no question. The outback is the #1 selling vehicle here.
I dont believe most Subaru fans are looking for a new sleek space-ship design. We want the cross between rugged, refined, flexible, and environmentally responsible. When my wife saw the Solterra, she said "yuck, doesnt look like a subaru." I dont entirely agree with her, but I get where she's coming from. For what its worth, she doesn't like the ID4 either!
Who agrees?
 

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From what I know, taking existing car and just change ICE to BEV is terrible idea, because everything around was designed to ICE needs and BEV needs are just too different.
Don't remember who did it (it was more manufacturers), they did exactly this, remove ICE, make it BEV and mostly it had terrible parameters. It is just better to start "from scratch" and design everything as BEV.
 

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From what I know, taking existing car and just change ICE to BEV is terrible idea, because everything around was designed to ICE needs and BEV needs are just too different.
Don't remember who did it (it was more manufacturers), they did exactly this, remove ICE, make it BEV and mostly it had terrible parameters. It is just better to start "from scratch" and design everything as BEV.
There are quite a few manufacturers that have taken the "any fuel" route, with mixed results. Volvo, early Hyundai and Kia EVs, BMW (i4, iX1 and iX3, i7), Ford (Focus EV) and so on. They're hedging their bets, but ending up with compromised designs.
 

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What I dont understand is why Subaru doesnt just re-engineer their existing, fantastic, best selling vehicles as BEV's. An electric Outback Wilderness would outsell every other vehicle in the entire state, no question. The outback is the #1 selling vehicle here.
Subaru is a small company without the deep pockets required to develop competitive EVs on its own. Re-engineering an existing ICE would yield a car that's neither as good as its ICE version nor the EV it could be if designed from scratch.
 

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Have a look at this vid:

A good description and mild testing by a well regarded Japanese auto journalist. I like the car more than any of the Subaru SUVs and will trade my cherry BRZ for one soon.
 

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Just joined this forum (although I have been lurking as a non-member since April). Generally, I will read and get a feel for a new forum and it's membership before posting much.

I "discovered" Subarus when I moved from Virginia to New England in 1997 and needed something that could get me through the nasty winter weather, and to some pretty rugged outdoor spots. My first attempt at such a vehicle was a Ford Explorer, which was OK, but unrefined. In 2006, I bought an Impreza 2.5i, and have never looked back (the Solterra will be my 4th Subaru). Unfortunately, that gallant lady finally succumbed to age and wear in June, with 293K+ HARD miles on the odometer.

I have had solar panels on my roof since 2005, so I had already decided that my my next vehicle purchase would be an electric Subaru, from back when they were talking about the "Evoltis" -- I'm glad they dropped that name! I had my Solterra order placed within 12 minutes of the US orders opening, and when I received the e-mail to go to my dealer and order it, I was the second customer to do so.

I understand Subarus decisions on range and battery charging, although I wouldn't say no to better numbers in these areas, I know that those specs will serve me just fine 99.9% of the time. I like the styling (although I wish the interior looked more like a Subaru and less like a Toyota), with the possible exception of the gauge cluster. Jury's still out on that one.

I'm a patient person -- so far, I'm still seeing an end of September delivery date, of which I am skeptical, but I'll get it when I get it.

That's enough from me, by way of introduction. Looking forward to participating in some good discussions.
 

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Subaru's Global Platform, AFAIK, does have design provisions for electrification. Whether that's just supportive of hybrid vehicles or can handle full EV, I do not know.
 

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I'm not for electrifying the current Outback. But, I am for a new from the ground-up Subaru EV design approximating the size and shape of the Outback while optimizing it as an EV. It needs to have 300+ miles range and charge at 200+ kW. And the height needs to be tall enough so the hip height isn't close to the floor for rear seat passengers. While they're at it, they need to give it route planning that integrates chargers with alternate routes shown and waypoint additions. Also, it should have on-route battery preconditioning that can be both automatically and manually activated. And give it dog mode and camp mode. Not asking for much. 😄✨
 

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I'm not for electrifying the current Outback. But, I am for a new from the ground-up Subaru EV design approximating the size and shape of the Outback while optimizing it as an EV. It needs to have 300+ miles range and charge at 200+ kW. And the height needs to be tall enough so the hip height isn't close to the floor for rear seat passengers. While they're at it, they need to give it route planning that integrates chargers with alternate routes shown and waypoint additions. Also, it should have on-route battery preconditioning that can be both automatically and manually activated. And give it dog mode and camp mode. Not asking for much. 😄✨

And under $50,000 :p
 

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With all that, I could see $57K+ for the top trim. Oh, and give me a fully stopping S-pedal, a % SOC indication, a glove box, rear wiper and power front passenger seat.⚡
For the. top trim, I'd like a stick shift that I can row. And dual sub woofers where the tail pipes would have been that make the car sound like an STI.
 
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