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So, in the front of the owner's manual, it says that there are descriptions of options that may not be included in your vehicle, that it covers both Canadian and American models.

In the customization section, it says that you can set the max DC charging power to 50 kW, 75 kW, 100 kW, or 125 kW.

I initially thought that the 125 kW was for the folks privileged to get the Panasonic batteries. But, if that was the case, wouldn't the maximum DC charging power be 150 kW?

Is Subaru planning to bump the max DC charging power for the cattle batteries to 125 kW?
 

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So, in the front of the owner's manual, it says that there are descriptions of options that may not be included in your vehicle, that it covers both Canadian and American models.

In the customization section, it says that you can set the max DC charging power to 50 kW, 75 kW, 100 kW, or 125 kW.

I initially thought that the 125 kW was for the folks privileged to get the Panasonic batteries. But, if that was the case, wouldn't the maximum DC charging power be 150 kW?

Is Subaru planning to bump the max DC charging power for the cattle batteries to 125 kW?
That’s actually very encouraging. It suggests that the Solterra has a charge controller capable of more than the original stated 100 kW max. The 150 kW is for the bz4X FWD.
 

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So, in the front of the owner's manual, it says that there are descriptions of options that may not be included in your vehicle, that it covers both Canadian and American models.

In the customization section, it says that you can set the max DC charging power to 50 kW, 75 kW, 100 kW, or 125 kW.

I initially thought that the 125 kW was for the folks privileged to get the Panasonic batteries. But, if that was the case, wouldn't the maximum DC charging power be 150 kW?

Is Subaru planning to bump the max DC charging power for the cattle batteries to 125 kW?
Very interesting! Also, on page 113, it shows how to set charging speed starting at MAX and dropping to 125kW, 100kW, 75kW, and 50kW. This implies that MAX is 150kW. If that's the case, I'll be elated! Of course, this could be a copy and paste job from the European Solterra manual that has yet to be adjusted for our battery. But, I can hope.🤞
 

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So, in the front of the owner's manual, it says that there are descriptions of options that may not be included in your vehicle, that it covers both Canadian and American models.

In the customization section, it says that you can set the max DC charging power to 50 kW, 75 kW, 100 kW, or 125 kW.

I initially thought that the 125 kW was for the folks privileged to get the Panasonic batteries. But, if that was the case, wouldn't the maximum DC charging power be 150 kW?

Is Subaru planning to bump the max DC charging power for the cattle batteries to 125 kW?
Who are this privileged folks that can get Panasonic batteries?
 

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Some DCFC charge based off power flow on minutes (time) rather than per kWh delivered. So, if you are not in a rush, I suppose you could force the DCFC rate down to a lower tier, and save some cash per minute. Especially if the tier is something like 99 kWh and higher.
 
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Who are this privileged folks that can get Panasonic batteries?
CATL supplies batteries to Tesla, BMW, VW, and others so don’t think CATL batteries are inferior. Why they announced they are limiting them to 100kW charging I don’t know.
 

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Toyota’s end game goal here seems to be a class leading battery retention metric after 10 years, so that is the main focus
 

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I wouldn't obsess too much about whether the max charge rate is 150 or 100 kW. Top charge rate can only happen under ideal conditions (after hard driving, low SOC, and higher outside air temps), and then only for a very short time. Here is an article about the Lucid Air, which is the only EV with a 900V system, and highest charge rate. Note how quickly it drops off.
It matters most at a low SOC. but typically on a trip you don't let it run too low. Or at least I didn't as you never know when the next charger on your route might have a problem or be busy.
 

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I wouldn't obsess too much about whether the max charge rate is 150 or 100 kW. Top charge rate can only happen under ideal conditions (after hard driving, low SOC, and higher outside air temps), and then only for a very short time. Here is an article about the Lucid Air, which is the only EV with a 900V system, and highest charge rate. Note how quickly it drops off.
It matters most at a low SOC. but typically on a trip you don't let it run too low. Or at least I didn't as you never know when the next charger on your route might have a problem or be busy.
I'm planning on running it down close to 0% for the sweeter spot of the charging curve. Various apps let you know the status of the chargers, and I plan to have bailout options. I'll probably set the charger arrival SOC to 5%, but adjust that down with speed as I approach the station with its status good. Not sure when or how severe the turtle mode is, though. For more accurate estimates and route execution, I plan to use an OBD dongle (if necessary) and ABRP in Android Auto to automatically take into account real-time car status info and weather, elevation, wind, etc.
 

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I'm planning on running it down close to 0% for the sweeter spot of the charging curve. Various apps let you know the status of the chargers, and I plan to have bailout options. I'll probably set the charger arrival SOC to 5%, but adjust that down with speed as I approach the station with its status good. Not sure when or how severe the turtle mode is, though. For more accurate estimates and route execution, I plan to use an OBD dongle (if necessary) and ABRP in Android Auto to automatically take into account real-time car status info and weather, elevation, wind, etc.
Not sure if you have ever owned a BEV. But you will soon learn that is not a good plan,... for many reasons.
 

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Not sure if you have ever owned a BEV. But you will soon learn that is not a good plan,... for many reasons.
I have not, but Kyle Conner has. I've watched most of his Out of Spec Motoring EV road trips, plus Bjorn Nyland in Norway. Yes, I'll need to start out conservatively, but dial it in as I gain experience. It just charges faster longer if you start near 0% and unplug after it tapers but usually not before I get 90 minutes of driving juice in it.
 

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Testing is one thing, but real life driving is another. Instead of charging as much as you can in one stop, you will learn the benefits of "opportunity" charging, ie plan your stops, even a pee break, where you can catch a bit of a charge.
 

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Testing is one thing, but real life driving is another. Instead of charging as much as you can in one stop, you will learn the benefits of "opportunity" charging, ie plan your stops, even a pee break, where you can catch a bit of a charge.
Precisely what I'm talking about and what Kyle Conner does. He calls it "charger-hopping" whereby you charge more often, but faster in the sweet spot of the charging curve. Ideally, you could drive for 90 minutes and charge for 15-20 minutes. This will actually require a 30 minute charge for the Solterra if assumptions are correct. I usually have to pee every 2 hours anyway. So, 1.5-2 hour legs would be ideal.
 

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Precisely what I'm talking about and what Kyle Conner does. He calls it "charger-hopping" whereby you charge more often, but faster in the sweet spot of the charging curve. Ideally, you could drive for 90 minutes and charge for 15-20 minutes. This will actually require a 30 minute charge for the Solterra if assumptions are correct. I usually have to pee every 2 hours anyway. So, 1.5-2 hour legs would be ideal.
Being an über-geek, I can really appreciate the fun involved in maximizing charging, etc. However, I’m really hoping this sort of necessity fades as EVs become more commonplace and the battery/charging tech advances. I couldn’t talk my wife into driving the manual-transmission cars I had when we were first married, and she’s already warned me that having to carefully plan our re-fueling stops for a multi-state trip is a non-starter for her, particularly during a vacation when the focus is on stress reduction.
 

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Testing is one thing, but real life driving is another. Instead of charging as much as you can in one stop, you will learn the benefits of "opportunity" charging, ie plan your stops, even a pee break, where you can catch a bit of a charge.
can you even do that in the solterra. I thought I read no more that 2 fast charges a day. Not certain what that means. Is that 2 no matter how much you charge or 2 up to 100%. is that a recommendation or will the software force this.
 
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