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I think Toyota uses that tactic because they are the only ones thinking logically. I don't think its the right way to say it, but they aren't wrong in their thinking.
Completely agree that governments need to step up their game with some of this stuff. In the UK our government no longer support building new renewable energy infrastructure meaning that we’re effectively going backwards with nuclear plants reaching the end of their life.

It is going to be hard making it happen by 2030/35. I think hydrogen will end up being used in commercial vehicles more than anything else - I think it’s too much infrastructure for everyday cars - it’s more than DCFC and you’d need a lot more of them as you can’t top it up at home.

But also I’d like to see us reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. PHEVs do allow that, especially for short trips. But really we want to reduce that to zero as soon as possible… governments need to make it happen. Somehow…
 

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Don't know if the SoA President really said that, but I hope you're not surprised that a president promise something and do not deliver. Toyota Exec said in 2021 "The target set for the upcoming Toyota bZ4X and following BEVs is 90% of initial battery capacity (and range) maintained over 10 years of usage. ", the word "target" here is really important. The official number is 70% and they are not promising 90% anywhere.
It was at a press event in Arizona inviting the automotive media to sit in and film the cars. But I misspoke, the guy was only a Vice President. I would not be surprised at all if that prediction fails to materialize. There are just too many variables on battery life to be sure of that. But again, they would be foolish in the extreme to say they engineered it in a certain way, knowing that they didn't.

You know that Solterra and bZ4x AWD are using the Panasonic battery in Europe, Japan, and probably other markets? It's already engineered and integrated.
Yes it is... but not for the North Amreican market. Why was that? Again, continuing the theme, they are the decision not to do that for a reason: global supply chain issues (remember, NA vehicles were originally planned to be built first, until wheelgate messed up the schedule), environmental or trade regulations. I don't know. But I can rule out one reason: deliberately stiffing North American customers or reducing the range and charging capacity of those vehicles compared to others. North American spec vehicles have a parts list, so that's how you build them, no matter what engineering changes you may have made for other vehicles. Yes they may retrofit that battery for future model years here (if I were a betting man, I'd put money on it), but they're not going to re-engineer those vehicles, or scrap a couple million dollars worth of batteries, just because they've upgraded the spec.

It seems that they did the exactly the opposite, they customized the vehicle for some market (different battery pack) and they always did anyway. For exemple, the base model in US doesn't have same options included. All trims are different and it make sense, in Canada you usually get Heated seats/steering included in base versions, but optional in the US
No, they didn't. They spec'd vehicles one way for North America, and differently for Europe. Again, there was some deliberate decision made there, and it wasn't to deliver crappy vehicles to one market. Why not heated seats? Probably to limit the number of different configurations coming off the line in the first months of production.

The takeaway here is that it's really pointless to try to second-guess the engineering and design and product management teams. As I've repeatedly said, no one deliberately makes a bad decision or does things to spite their customers, but lots of people make decisions in the absence of perfect information that turn out to be lousy. If you wait for perfect information, you never finish.
 

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I doubt any manufacturer deliberately designs a vehicle for a particular market in order to deliberately deliver crappy vehicles, but costs have always been, and will always be, a significant factor in the offering decision. So, in a way, those two things are not mutually exclusive. I’d guess all manufacturers have, at some point had to issue a recall in order to remedy a situation caused by going the ”cheap route”.If one is old enough to remember the Chevy Vega and Ford Pinto, they will understand that statement.

Equipment limitations and optioning are another way of costs containment, but more from a “what will the market demand/accept?” and less of costs cutting, yet in many cases the results are practically the same.

It makes sense to allocate a particular piece of equipment (think traction batteries, as an example) to a particular market, especially when there are multiple sources of supply, even if there are variances between the performance characteristics of the supplied components…as long as the differences aren’t too significant. It just makes the logistics of parts supplying easier to handle.

Regarding the Panasonic battery offering in non USA markets, my question would be… How much extra would the average buyer be willing to pay for it? Vehicle pricing is different in different markets, and not solely due to currency exchange rates. Different markets have different demands and expectations, and all of that factors into vehicle pricing, equipment and option offerings within those individual markets.

Competition from other manufacturers also comes into play.
 

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I admittedly have not read everything written or said about the subject, but I would think that very frequently products have different “targets” for life span when compared to any warranty or guaranteed minimums. For example a water heater should last you a decade or so, but the warranty is probably 5 years

So to me it isn’t surprising at all that someone would say we are targeting our engineering for 90% retention after 10 years, but that the warranty would be less than that or even the same as everyone else’s warranty. Especially with as little real world experience there is for modern BEVs that are 10 years old.

If you warranty that after 10 years the battery will be at 90% retention or better than if you are even wrong by 1-2% that could be a significant issue.

at the end of the day it probably is how much you think you can trust the company that they did the things that would move the needle towards their stated goal of 90% retention.
 
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